Stat graphs — Martin-Manley, Weisman climb the charts

More numbers from the KF era than you're going to want/need

University of Iowa, Football,
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January 22, 2014 | 11:59 am
Last one of these.
The feedback has been solid. Hope you can at least get a point of reference for what numbers are good and bad in the KF era.
I want to wrap this up. This is going to be super long, but digestible.
QB NUMBERS
Premise: One more time on these. I ran this one at the bottom of a post last week. Again, should give you an idea on what numbers work for Iowa. Of course, there are outliers (Vandenberg’s 2011 is one of the all-time best for an Iowa QB).
2013 — Jake Rudock 204 of 346 for 2,383 yards, 59 percent completions, 18 TDs, 13 INTs, 126.47 efficiency
2012 — James Vandenberg 223 of 389 for 2,249 yards, 57.3 percent completions, 7 TDs, 8 INTs, 107.72 efficiency
2011 — James Vandenberg 237 of 404 for 3,022 yards, 58.7 percent completions, 25 TDs, 7 INTs, 138.44 efficiency
2010 — Ricky Stanzi 221 of 345 for 3,004 yards, 64.1 percent completions, 25 TDs, 6 INTs, 157.63 efficiency
2009 — Ricky Stanzi 171 of 304 for 2,417 yards, 56.3 percent completions, 15 TDs, 15 INTs, 131.62 efficiency
2008 — Ricky Stanzi 150 of 254 for 1,956 yards, 59.1 percent completions, 14 TDs, 9 INTs, 134.35 efficiency
2007 — Jake Christensen 198 of 370 for 2,269 yards, 53.5 percent completions, 17 TDs, 6 INTs, 116.94 efficiency
2006 — Drew Tate 207 of 352 for 2,623 yards, 58.8 percent completions, 18 TDs, 13 INTs, 130.89 efficiency
2005 — Drew Tate 219 of 352 for 2,828 yards, 62.2 percent completions, 22 TDs, 7 INTs, 146.35 efficiency
2004 — Drew Tate 233 of 375 for 2,786 yards, 62.1 percent completions, 20 TDs, 14 INTs, 134.67 efficiency
2003 — Nathan Chandler 165 of 307 for 2,040 yards, 53.7 percent completions, 18 TDs, 10 INTs, 122.40 efficiency
2002 — Brad Banks 170 of 294 for 2,575 yards, 57.8 percent completions, 26 TDs, 5 INTs, 157.12 efficiency
2001 — Kyle McCann 167 of 252 for 2,028 yards, 66.3 percent completions, 16 TDs, 11 INTs, 146.09 efficiency
2000 — Trio II 230 of 404 for 2,580 yards, 56.9 percent completions, 16 TDs, 11 INTs, 118.20 efficiency
1999 — Trio I 202 of 376 for 2,275 yards, 53.7 percent completions, 6 TDs, 9 INTs, 105.03 efficiency
Trio I — Kyle McCann, Randy Reiners, Scott Mullen
Trio II — McCann, Mullen, Jon Beutjer
Conclusion: Iowa has six QBs in the chute — senior Cody Sokol (6-2), junior Rudock (6-3), sophomore C.J. Beathard (6-3), freshman Nic Shimonek (6-4), incoming freshman Tyler Wiegers (6-4) and 2015 commit Jack Beneventi (6-6). Let’s see what happens.
PBU/INT
Premise: It seems as though Iowa always has at least one NFL-caliber defensive back.
2013 — 39 PBU (B.J. Lowery 16), 13 INT (James Morris 4)
2012 — 38 PBU (Micah Hyde 14), 10 INT (Castillo, Kirksey, Donatell 2)
2011 — 39 PBU (Broderick Binns, Hyde 8), 10 INT (Tanner Miller, Hyde 3)
2010 — 43 PBU (Hyde 7), 19 INT (Brett Greenwood 5)
2009 — 65 PBU (Binns 9), 21 INT (Tyler Sash 6)
2008 — 53 PBU (Bradley Fletcher 10), 23 INT (Sash 6)
2007 — 51 PBU (Charles Godfrey 9), 14 INT (Godfrey 5)
2006 — 50 PBU (Miguel Merrick 9), 14 INT (Shada, Merrick, Humpal 2)
2005 — 51 PBU (Jovon Johnson 11), 10 INT (Johnson, Shada 3)
2004 — 41 PBU (Sean Considine 9), 17 INT (Johnson, Allen 4)
2003 — 55 PBU (Johnson 13), 13 INT (Johnson 6)
2002 — 64 PBU (D.J. Johnson 15), 20 INT (Johnson, Pagel 4)
2001 — 68 PBU (Benny Sapp, Matt Stockdale 12), 13 INT (Bob Sanders 4)
2000 — 58 PBU (Sapp 13), 9 INT (Ryan Hansen 3)
1999 — 34 PBU (Tariq Holman 10), 6 INT (Holman 3)
Conclusion: The 2009 defensive line generated 16 pass breakups, led by Binns’ 9. Remember those Inspector Gadget arms? More impressive numbers from the 2001 defense. You could argue Iowa’s D under Ferentz turned the corner before the offense did. B.J. Lowery topped D.J. Johnson for KF era high in PBU this season with 16.
PENALTIES
Premise: Let’s check discipline, smarts, luck, whatever you want to call a team that avoids penalties. And hey, look at the 2013 Hawkeyes, tying for fewest penalties in the KF era despite the fact that it had 11 penalties against Missouri State this season, the most for an Iowa team since 12 against Kent State in 2005. (The most and least are in bold.)
2013 — 52 penalties (4.0 a game) for 425 yards (32.7 yards a game)
2012 — 55 penalties (4.6 a game) for 491 yards (40.9 yards a game)
2011 — 62 penalties (4.8 a game) for 463 yards (35.6 yards a game)
2010 — 64 penalties (4.9 a game) for 486 yards (37.4 yards a game)
2009 — 57 penalties (4.4 a game) for 447 yards (34.4 yards a game)
2008 — 53 penalties (4.1 a game) for 446 yards (34.3 yards a game)
2007 — 67 penalties (5.6 a game) for 611 yards (50.9 yards a game)
2006 — 65 penalties (5.0 a game) for 581 yards (44.7 yards a game)
2005 — 52 penalties (4.0 a game) for 447 yards (37.2 yards a game)
2004 — 54 penalties (4.1 a game) for 349 yards (26.8 yards a game)
2003 — 57 penalties (4.4 a game) for 450 yards (34.6 yards a game)
2002 — 103 penalties (7.9 a game) for 873 yards (67.2 yards a game)
2001 — 78 penalties (6.5 a game) for 595 yards (49.6 yards a game)
2000 — 78 penalties (6.5 a game) for 652 yards (54.3 yards a game)
1999 — 59 penalties (5.4 a game) for 451 yards (41.0 yards a game)
Conclusion: Look at the difference between KF’s two Big Ten co-champs. The 2002 team was a free-for-all. By far the most penalties (67.2 yards a game!!!). The 2004 team, which had virtually no rushing game, valued every yards, fewest yards and nearly the fewest penalties. The 2001 team lost nearly 50 yards a game. Probably a big deal for a team that finished 7-5. Stat I will keep next season: Who gets penalized for what.
CARRY PERCENTAGE
Premise: What RB carried the ball the most? When was Iowa its most productive in the running game? And then we’ll rank KF-era leading rushers. (Highs and lows are bolded.)
2013 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 2,338. Rushes: 556. Carry percentage: Mark Weisman 41 percent (226); Damon Bullock 21 percent.
2012 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 1,476. Rushes: 404. Carry percentage: Weisman 39 percent (159); Bullock 33 percent.
2011 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 1,790. Rushes: 453. Carry percentage: Marcus Coker 62 percent (281); Jordan Canzeri 7 percent.
2010 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 1,929. Rushes: 449. Carry percentage: Adam Robinson 45 percent (203); Coker 25 percent.
2009 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 1,485. Rushes: 454. Carry percentage: Robinson 40 percent (181); Brandon Wegher 37 percent.
2008 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 2,453. Rushes: 515. Carry percentage: Shonn Greene 60 percent (307); Jewel Hampton 18 percent.
2007 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 1,515. Rushes: 438. Carry percentage: Albert Young 47 percent (206); Damian Sims 23 percent.
2006 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 1,865. Rushes: 432. Carry percentage: Young 41 percent (178); Sims 31 percent.
2005 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 2,096. Rushes: 436. Carry percentage: Young 57 percent (249); Sims 7 percent.
2004 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 871. Rushes: 428. Carry percentage: Sam Brownlee 22 percent (94); Jermelle Lewis 13 percent.
2003 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 2,241. Rushes: 535. Carry percentage: Fred Russell 53 percent (282); Lewis 8 percent.
2002 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 2,784. Rushes: 553. Carry percentage: Russell 40 percent (220); Lewis 22 percent.
2001 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 2,104. Rushes: 488. Carry percentage: Ladell Betts 45 percent (222); Aaron Greving 12 percent.
2000 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 1,090. Rushes: 403. Carry percentage: Betts 57 percent (232); Jeremy Allen 8 percent.
1999 — Iowa’s total rush yardage: 1,028. Rushes: 339. Carry percentage: Betts 55 percent (189); Scott Mullen 14 percent.
Conclusion: In 2013, Iowa ran the ball more than it ever has in the KF era. It also was the first year since 2004 (the year of the ACL) that Iowa had three running backs with double digits in carry percentages. It’ll be interesting to see how that breaks next season. Remember, LeShun Daniels and Markel Smith might be in the mix. Who knows about Barkley Hill and Michael Malloy. Done speculating. Don’t ask.
QB RUSHING
Premise: Why not? This is with sacks factored in, which is probably the lesser tell on what a QB has done on the run. (It definitely is.)
2013 — Jake Rudock 67 carries, 218 yards, 5 TDs
2012 — James Vandenberg 63 carries, 16 yards, 4 TDs
2011 — Vandenberg 78 carries, 61 yards, 3 TDs
2010 — Ricky Stanzi 48 carries, -6 yards, 2 TDs
2009 — Stanzi 55 carries, -31 yards, 0 TDs
2008 — Stanzi 56 carries, 20 yards, 0 TDs
2007 — Jake Christensen 99 carries, 0 yards, 1 TD
2006 — Drew Tate 49 carries, 124 yards, 0 TDs
2005 — Tate 44 carries, 114 yards, 1 TD
2004 — Tate 89 carries, -76 yards, 2 TDs
2003 — Nathan Chandler 89 carries, 138 yards, 6 TDs
2002 — Brad Banks 81 carries, 423 yards, 5 TDs
2001 — Banks 41 carries, 151 yards, 2 TDs
Kyle McCann 58 carries, 78 yards, 3 TDs
2000 — McCann 56 carries, -23 yards, 1 TD
1999 — Scott Mullen 48 carries, 114 yards, 4 TDs
Conclusion: Keep in mind, Jake Christensen was sacked 46 times in 2007, so that 99 rushes comes with an asterisk. Clearly, Brad Banks was the most productive; Stanzi was the least (he wasn’t a runner, he would be the first to tell you that). Rudock was sneaky with his production. After he injured his knee against Wisconsin (and then the other one at Nebraska), he rushed 22 times for 31 yards, so the injuries clearly cut into his game.
RANKING KF RUNNERS
Premise: Why not? A little perspective. This is best seasons in KF era.
1. Shonn Greene 307 carries for 1,850 yards, 20 TDs (2008)
2. Marcus Coker 281 carries for 1,384 yards, 15 TDs (2011)
3. Fred Russell 282 carries for 1,355 yards, 7 TDs (2003)
4. Albert Young 249 carries for 1,334 yards, 8 TDs (2005)
5. Russell 220 carries for 1,264 yards, 9 TDs (2002)
6. Ladell Betts 232 carries for 1,090 yards, 5 TDs (2000)
7. Betts 222 carries for 1,060 yards, 10 TDs (2001)
8. Mark Weisman 226 carries for 974 yards, 8 TDs (2013)
9. Young 206 carries for 968 yards, 6 TDs (2007)
10. Adam Robinson 203 carries for 941 yards, 10 TDs (2010)
11. Betts 189 carries for 857 yards, 5 TDs (1999)
12. Robinson 181 carries for 834 yards, 5 TDs (2009)
13. Weisman 159 carries for 815 yards, 8 TDs (2012)
14. Young 178 carries for 779 yards, 7 TDs (2006)
15. Jermelle Lewis 123 carries for 709 yards, 8 TDs (2002)
TOP CAREER RUSHERS IN KF ERA
1. Ladell Betts 831 carries for 3,686 yards, 25 TDs (1998-01)
2. Albert Young 660 carries for 3,173 yards, 23 TDs (2004-07)
3. Fred Russell 514 carries for 2,760 yards, 17 TDs (2001-03)
4. Shonn Greene 347 carries for 2,107 yards, 22 TDs (2005-06, ’08)
5. Marcus Coker 395 carries for 2,006 yards, 18 TDs (2010-11)
6. Mark Weisman 385 carries for 1,789 yards, 16 TDs (20012-03)
7. Adam Robinson 384 carries for 1,775 yards, 15 TDs (2009-10)
8. Damian Sims 279 carries for 1,504 yards, 13 TDs (2004-07)
9. Jermelle Lewis 226 carries for 1,150 yards, 10 TDs (2002-04)
10. Damon Bullock 257 carries for 1,000 yards, 4 TDs (2011-13)
Conclusion: It’s not a huge stat, but Iowa hasn’t had a 1,000-yard rusher since Coker in 2011. Weisman was as close as you can get (almost) this season. Albert Young and Ladell Betts up there three times. Two sterling years for Fred Russell. Doak Walker Award for Shonn Greene in 2008. Hard to argue who’s best. My vote for career is Betts. Damon Bullock sneaks in there with 1,000 career rushing yards. And, yes, Betts rushed for 679 yards as a freshman in 1998, so, technically, maybe Young is No. 1 in KF era.
STOPPING THE RUN
Premise: Iowa has been good vs. the run under KF. Let’s see how good. (Highs and lows are bolded.)
2013 — 466 rushes, 1,669 yards, 3.58 a carry, 8 rush TDs allowed, 80 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 5.82 plays
2012 — 473 rushes, 1,945 yards, 4.11 a carry, 16 rush TDs allowed, 53 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 8.9 plays
2011 — 549 rushes, 2,028 yards, 3.69 a carry, 16 rush TDs allowed, 62 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 8.8 plays
2010 — 407 rushes, 1,320 yards, 3.24 a carry, 13 rush TDs allowed, 57 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 7.14 plays
2009 — 461 rushes, 1,607 yards, 3.49 a carry, 9 rush TDs allowed, 73 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 6.3 plays
2008 — 397 rushes, 1,222 yards, 3.08 a carry, 7 rush TDs allowed, 67 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 5.92 plays
2007 — 454 rushes, 1,459 yards, 3.21 a carry, 11 rush TDs allowed, 66 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 6.87 plays
2006 — 480 rushes, 1,737 yards, 3.6 a carry, 14 rush TDs allowed, 68 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 7.05 plays
2005 — 470 rushes, 1,512 yards, 3.2 a carry, 10 rush TDs allowed, 82 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 5.73 plays
2004 — 392 rushes, 1,110 yards, 2.8 a carry, 8 rush TDs allowed, 77 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 5.09 plays
2003 — 480 rushes, 1,205 yards, 2.5 a carry, 10 rush TDs allowed, 91 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 5.27 plays
2002 — 416 rushes, 1,065 yards, 2.6 a carry, 17 rush TDs allowed, 88 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 4.72 plays
2001 — 437 rushes, 1,405 yards, 3.2 a carry, 12 rush TDs allowed, 92 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 4.75 plays
2000 — 521 rushes, 2,331 yards, 4.5 a carry, 17 rush TDs allowed, 79 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 6.59 plays
1999 — 545 rushes, 2,698 yards, 5.0 a carry, 20 rush TDs allowed, 44 tackles for loss. Mayhem number: TFL every 12.38 plays
Conclusion: Iowa was middle third during the KF era in 2013. The 2001 to 2004 defenses set the bar pretty high. And, yes, it’s been hard to run against Iowa the last 13 years (maybe 12 years if you take out 2012, which wasn’t stellar, either).
SACKS ALLOWED/DISRUPTION FREQUENCY
Premise: Pretty good in 2013. (Highs and lows in bold.)
2013 — 15 sacks allowed for 61 yards; 39 passes broken up. 375 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 6.94
2012 — 22 sacks allowed for 156 yards; 43 passes broken up. 389 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 5.98
2011 — 29 sacks allowed for 209 yards; 45 passes broken up. 412 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 5.56
2010 — 20 sacks allowed for 141 yards; 35 passes broken up. 357 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 6.49
2009 — 19 sacks allowed for 140 yards; 38 passes broken up. 392 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 6.87
2008 — 27 sacks allowed for 248 yards; 33 passes broken up. 320 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 5.3
2007 — 46 sacks allowed for 271 yards; 35 passes broken up. 376 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 4.64
2006 — 23 sacks allowed for 124 yards; 33 passes broken up. 423 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 7.5
2005 — 19 sacks allowed for 115 yards; 40 passes broken up. 404 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 6.84
2004 — 40 sacks allowed for 290 yards; 23 passes broken up. 385 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 6.11
2003 — 24 sacks allowed for 162 yards; 23 passes broken up. 320 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 6.80
2002 — 12 sacks allowed for 82 yards; 42 passes broken up. 314 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 5.81
2001 — 20 sacks allowed for 110 yards; 26 passes broken up. 323 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 7.02
2000 — 57 sacks allowed for 384 yards; 59 passes broken up. 404 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 3.48
1999 — 20 sacks allowed for 95 yards; 28 passes broken up. 376 pass attempts. Mayhem number against: 7.83
Conclusion: The 2013 OL protected the QB as well as any OL in the KF era save 2002. That 7.83 mayhem number in 1999 is an outlier. That team was obviously bad. Again, another interesting number from the 2001 team, which was very, very close to being a 10-win team.
RANKING KF ERA RECEIVERS
Premise: First, we’ll go with total yards in a season. Then, receptions in a season.
1. Marvin McNutt 1,315 yards, 12 TDs (2011)
2. Kevin Kasper 1,010 yards, 7 TDs (2000)
3. Maurice Brown 966 yards, 11 TDs (2002)
4. Clinton Solomon 905 yards, 6 TDs (2004)
5. McNutt 861 yards, 8 TDs (2010)
6. Kahlil Hill 841 yards, 8 TDs (2001)
7. Solomon 800 yards, 7 TDs (2005)
8. Derrell Johnson-Koulianos 750 yards, 2 TDs (2009)
9. Johnson-Koulianos 745 yards, 10 TDs (2010)
10. Ed Hinkel 744 yards, 7 TDs (2004)
11. Dallas Clark 742 yards, 4 TDs (2002)
12. Andy Brodell 724 yards, 5 TDs (2006)
13. Keenan Davis 713 yards, 4 TDs (2011)
14. McNutt 674 yards, 8 TDs (2009)
15. Kasper 664 yards, 3 TDs (1999)
Conclusion: The big dog is Marvin McNutt with his name on this list three seasons. Sneaky good career? Kahlil Hill.
RECEPTIONS
1. (tie) Marvin McNutt (2011)
Kevin Kasper (2000) 82
3. Ed Hinkel (2004) 63
4. Kasper (1999) 60
5. Kahlil Hill (2001) 59
6. (tie) Hill (2000)
Clinton Solomon (2004) 58
8. McNutt (2010) 53
9. Keenan Davis (2011) 50
10. Dominique Douglas (2006) 49
11. Maurice Brown (2002) 48
12. (tie) Derrell Johnson-Koulianos (2010)
Solomon (2005) 46
14. Johnson-Koulianos (2009) 45
15. Johnson-Koulianos (2008) 44
CAREER YARDAGE
1. Marvin McNutt 2,861 yards, 28 TDs (2008-11)
2. Derrell Johnson-Koulianos 2,616 yards, 17 TDs (2007-10)
3. Kevin Kasper 1,912 yards, 11 TDs (1997-00)
4. Kahlil Hill 1,892 yards, 15 TDs (1998-01)
5. Clinton Solomon 1,864 yards, 14 TDs (2002, 2004-05)
6. Ed Hinkel 1,588 yards, 15 TDs (2002-05)
7. Maurice Brown 1,515 yards, 15 TDs (2000-03)
8. Keenan Davis 1,470 yards, 7 TDs (2009-12)
9. Scott Chandler 1,467 yards, 10 TDs (2003-06)
10. Andy Brodell 1,395 yards, 9 TDs (2005-08)
11. Dallas Clark 1,281 yards, 8 TDs (2001-02)
12. Kevonte Martin-Manley 1,218 yards, 8 TDs (2010-14)
CAREER RECEPTIONS
1. Derrell Johnson-Koulianos 173 (2007-10)
2. Marvin McNutt 170 (2008-11)
3. Kevin Kasper 157 (1997-00)
4. Kahlil Hill 152 (1998-01)
5. Kevonte Martin-Manley 119 (2010-14)
6. Clinton Solomon 118 (2002, 2004-05)
7. Scott Chandler 117 (2003-06)
8. Keenan Davis 112 (2009-12)
9. Andy Brodell 91 (2005-08)
10. (tie) Maurice Brown (2000-03)
and C.J. Fiedorowicz 84 (2010-2013)
Conclusion: Kevonte Martin-Manley needs 55 receptions next season to become Iowa’s career leader in receptions (not just KF era).
Iowa final notes and stats
 
Final Notes 2013 by Marc Morehouse

 
Final Big Ten notes and stats
2014 Big Ten Kickoff Luncheon and Football Media Days: The 2014 Big Ten Football Media Days and Kickoff Luncheon will be held at the Hilton Chicago on Michigan Avenue. The 2014 event will be held on Monday, July 28, and Tuesday, July 29, with the luncheon scheduled for July 29.
Big Ten Polling Place: With bowl season complete, five Big Ten schools received votes in the final Associated Press (AP) or USA Today coaches polls, including at least two top-10 teams for the fifth time in the last six seasons . . .
Coming Up Roses:  In the 100th Rose Bowl Game, Michigan State defeated No. 5 Stanford, 24-20, to improve to 4-1 all-time in Pasadena, the best winning percentage of any team to make more than two appearances . . .
Spartan Triple Play:  With a win in the 100th Rose Bowl Game, Michigan State recorded a third straight bowl victory for the first time in school history . . .
Huskers Win Gator Bowl:  Nebraska defeated No. 22 Georgia, 24-19, in the TaxSlayer.com Gator Bowl behind the longest pass play in school, conference and Gator Bowl history . . .
Playing the Best:  Big Ten schools faced five programs that appeared among the top 25 of the final BCS rankings in bowl games, with two wins and three losses decided by 10 points or less . . .
Lucky 13:  Michigan State ended the 2013 campaign with a victory in the 100th Rose Bowl Game and a 13-1 record, the most wins in school history. The Spartans are only the third Big Ten team to win 13 or more contests in a season . . .
Double-Digit Winners:  For just the second time in Big Ten history, two teams finished the year with 12 or more victories, with Michigan State posting a 13-1 record and Ohio State registering a 12-2 mark . . .
Spartan Legend:  For the second time in four seasons, Michigan State was crowned Big Ten Champion following its victory over Ohio State in the Big Ten Championship Game . . .
Big Ten Coaches and Players Earn National Honors:  Multiple Big Ten standouts were honored with national awards this season . . .
  • Michigan State’s Darqueze Dennard (Jim Thorpe Award)
  • Wisconsin’s Jared Abbrederis (Burlsworth Trophy)
  • Michigan State Defensive Coordinator Pat Narduzzi (Broyles Award)
  • Penn State’s John Urschel (William V. Campbell Trophy)
  • Iowa’s James Morris, Michigan State’s Max Bullough, Nebraska’s Spencer Long and Penn State’s John Urschel (National Scholar-Athlete Award)
  • Nebraska’s C.J. Zimmerer and Northwestern’s Jeff Budzien (AFCA Good Works Team)
Making a Name for Themselves:  At least 19 Big Ten performers earned All-America honors from various publications, including nine first-team honorees . . .
  • Michigan’s Taylor Lewan
  • Michigan State’s Shilique Calhoun
  • Michigan State’s Darqueze Dennard
  • Michigan State’s Mike Sadler
  • Northwestern’s Jeff Budzien
  • Ohio State’s Jack Mewhort
  • Ohio State’s Ryan Shazier
  • Penn State’s Allen Robinson
  • Wisconsin’s Chris Borland
Head of the Class:  The Big Ten led all conferences with eight student-athletes named to the Capital One Academic All-America first or second teams. The Big Ten has led all Football Bowl Subdivision conferences in Academic All-Americans for nine straight seasons . . .
  • Indiana’s Mark Murphy
  • Iowa’s James Morris
  • Michigan State’s Max Bullough
  • Michigan State’s Mike Sadler
  • Nebraska’s Jake Long
  • Nebraska’s Spencer Long
  • Nebraska’s C.J. Zimmerer
  • Penn State’s John Urschel
Record Attendance:  The Big Ten established a new conference record for total attendance among all games and conference games only this season . . . In addition, the attendance of 66,002 at the 2013 Big Ten Football Championship Game established a new Big Ten record.
Nation’s Best Fans: Big Ten schools filled three of the top five spots in the NCAA rankings for average attendance while seven conference programs rated among the top 23 in the country overall . . .
Welcome to the Club:  The Big Ten will welcome one new head coach to the sidelines for the 2014 campaign in Penn State’s James Franklin . . .
A New Big Ten:  The 2014 season will mark the beginning of a new era in Big Ten football, with the addition of Maryland and Rutgers, adjusted division alignments and a new bowl lineup . . .
 
Final B1G Stats by Marc Morehouse


Read more: http://thegazette.com/2014/01/21/stat-graphs-martin-manley-weisman-climb-the-charts/#ixzz2r9Sgd4NC

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