Rockwell Collins to develop Navy technology to track GPS jamming signals

Company awarded three-year development contract

Dave DeWitte
Published: October 15 2012 | 10:54 am - Updated: 1 April 2014 | 2:00 am in

Rockwell Collins will develop technology to help the U.S. Navy locate and classify attempts to interfere with global positioning system (GPS) signals.

The research and development effort will be performed under a three-year contract from the Office of Naval Research, it was announced Monday.

The program is called the Modernized Integrated Spoofer Tracking (MIST) program. It provides for development of technology and prototype concepts to detect and locate the sources of transmitted signals intended to disrupt navigation and communication.

"This program will help assure that essential, high-accuracy navigation and timekeeping services are available to weapons platforms and military users while enabling war fighters to identify potential threats," Rockwell Collins Advanced Technology Center Vice President John Borghese said in a statement released by the company.

The contract continues a long history of Rockwell Collins advancements in GPS technology, the company said.

Rockwell Collins assisted the U.S. Air Force in developing GPS technology nearly 30 years ago. Under a contract with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Rockwell Collins later created the first all-digital miniature GPS receiver.

Rockwell Collins has since developed many GPS products and delivered more than one million GPS receivers that meet Federal Aviation and Department of Defense certification requirements.

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