No. 40: CB Greg Castillo

Marc Morehouse
Published: June 4 2012 | 12:01 am - Updated: 31 March 2014 | 7:58 pm in
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CORNERBACK GREG CASTILLO

Arrival: Greg Castillo held the No. 1 cornerback spot for two games last season. Phil Parker, Iowa's secondary coach then and defensive coordinator now, wanted Micah Hyde at safety and so they tried that. Steele Jantz lit up Iowa's defense (not just the secondary) in a triple overtime defeat at Iowa State last fall.

Castillo found himself outmuscled by wide receiver Darius Darks for a 4-yard TD after Iowa scored in the first overtime. The Hyde experiment at safety was over after ISU.

Tanner Miller moved in at free safety. Jordan Bernstine took over for Collin Sleeper at strong safety. Hyde moved over to his old spot and Castillo went to the bench.

"This is a competitive exercise and that's one of the first things we explain to everybody at the onset of practice back in August," Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz said. "The coaches' responsibility is to get the best-prepared guys on the field and to make sure everyone is prepared."

Can't argue with results.

2012 Takeoff: Instead of sulking away his career, Castillo emerged in a nickel/dime role and should be in line for similar duty in 2012. There will, however, be some competition for the No. 3 corner spot. Sophomore Jordan Lomax could push in. He could be the future at right corner with Hyde being a senior. Bears watching.

Castillo is a football legacy. His father, Juan, is the defensive coordinator for the Philadelphia Eagles. The Eagles' DC job came with a giant amount of heat last season. Philadelphia fans are quick and more than happy to point out that the Eagles were less than they needed to be.

Legacy status comes with thick skin, at least you would think. You make it to the NFL, you've succeeded more than you've failed, but there's that word fail. You're measured and quartered on a play-by-play basis.

Greg Castillo probably carries that with him and will fight for No. 3 CB and whatever role he earns himself on special teams. Coaches kids are generally built that way.

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